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FULL MOON KAYAK TOUR AT CANE CREEK STATE PARK | June 18

STAR CITY | There’s something almost otherworldly about the 1,675-acre Cane Creek Lake, a placid pool set within a strand of timber that darn-near delineates the point where Arkansas’ rolling hills meet the Delta flatlands. Maybe it’s the way the gnarly cypress trunks pierce the lake’s mirrorlike surface. Maybe it’s the fact that the lake empties into the mysterious Bayou Bartholomew, the world’s longest swamp. But whatever it is that makes Cane Creek Lake so spookily stunning, we can only imagine it’s magnified tenfold under the light of a full moon. In a kayak. In the stillness of the dark. Intrigued? All it takes is $15 and a call to the folks at Cane Creek State Park to reserve your spot on the monthly tour. (870-628-4714)

CYRILLE AIMÉE AT WALTON ARTS CENTER | June 3

FAYETTEVILLE | Hailing from the the picturesque town of Fontainebleau in France, vocalist Cyrille Aimée has snagged multiple jazz-fest wins across the world, thanks not only to the crispness of her voice, her riffs, curly-cue runs and scats, but also her preternatural ability to improvise and channel emotion. At times, it almost seems like a dance, when Cyrille slowly strays away from her native French and into meaningless, nonsense syllables, singing Photo-by-Ariane-Rousselierthe night away against the backdrop of her band. But don’t just take our word for it—the singer takes the stage at Walton Arts Center the first week of the month. (waltonartscenter.org)

FARM-TO-TABLE WEEKEND AT OZARK FOLK CENTER | June 17-18

MOUNTAIN VIEW | You don’t have to be knee-deep in the culinary world to know that the term “farm to table” has been running amok. But spend an afternoon with local farmers, touring their farms and indulging in their recipes, and you’ll find out that when the folks at the Ozark Folk Center throw a “farm-to-table” weekend, it’s usually the real deal. For a full weekend in the Ozark hillside, foodies will learn how to care for crops, when to harvest them, and—the best part—how to make the most of their bounty. (ozarkfolkcenter.com)

58th ANNUAL DELTA EXHIBITION | June 10 – August 28

LITTLE ROCK |  Here’s just a sampling of what you can expect to see at this year’s Delta: Concrete table settings, stacks of turtles drawn in pen and ink, textured panels vibrantly colored and recalling the earth. However, in considering why you should go, it’s not just for the sake of the exhibition’s characteristic variety—52 works chosen from the 1,038 submitted, up from last year’s 882—but rather what that variety says about the submitting artists. Because while eclectic and at times a tad overwhelming in originality, the works have at their hearts the spirit of this region reflected within—where its artists are born, rooted and informed.

Note: For those looking to see even more voices from the region, we’d recommend heading across the river to the Thea Foundation from June 1 through July 29 for Delta des Refusés, an unsanctioned curation culled from the artists who didn’t make the Delta’s final cut.

WINDFALL AT ARKANSAS REPERTORY THEATRE | June 10-26

LITTLE ROCK | Since 2016 kicked off, Jason Alexander (you might know him as Seinfeld’s neurotic George Costanza) has been keeping busy directing a new comedy, Windfall. And no, not in the celebrated theater scenes of New York and Chicago, but far away from their notoriously critical climate: right here in Arkansas. The play, which debuts this month at The Rep, tells the tale of four co-workers who bet their life savings on a lottery in hopes of sharing the $300 million jackpot, an act that brings them more trouble than fortune. With a witty script, cast and crew, Windfall is anticipated to be, shall we say, just the ticket? (therep.org)

RUTH REICHL AT CRYSTAL BRIDGES | June 7

BENTONVILLE | “People are writing their lives in food,” writer/editor/food-memoirist-extraordinaire Ruth Reichl said in a 2007 interview with NPR on the nature of the food-memoir movement. “They are actually looking at the world food-first.” We’ve got to admit: That sounds like a pretty sound perspective to us. And that food-first mentality, paired with Reichl’s delectable prose, is at least in part why we’ve relished every word written by the former Gourmet editor—and why we’ll be front and center, dog-eared copies of Tender at the Bone in our laps, at her Crystal Bridges lecture this month. (crystalbridges.org)